Protein

When just starting a fitness program, a balanced diet gives you the proper mix of proteins and carbohydrates to fuel your workouts. When training intensifies (heavy weightlifting, marathon or triathlon training), adding a protein supplement can give your workout a boost and help repair the body afterward.

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VEGAN PROTEIN VS COW PROTEIN 

The powders of choice among mainstream bodybuilders are whey and casein, which are proteins derived from cow’s milk. In fact, these are the substances of choice for most protein powder consumers worldwide.

Athletes from all walks of life embrace the consumption of excess protein under the assumption that more is better. Many companies (and entire industries) have gone to great lengths to convince the public that they need to seek out high protein foods and consume as much protein as possible, without any consideration of the health consequences that accompany excess consumption. The focus on consuming large amounts of protein is so engrained in our culture, there are often warnings given out by friends and relatives of those following a plant-based diet that protein will be hard to come by without consuming animal products. That is another way protein supplements squeeze their way into the diets of citizens everywhere, through the unwarranted fear that we won’t get enough of this specific nutrient, suggesting whey and casein as plausible aids in this quest.

Years ago, I learned from Dr. T. Colin Campbell’s book, written with his son, Dr. Thomas Campbell, The China Study, that casein has the ability to turn on and turn off cancer growth simply by adjusting the level of intake of that protein. This was determined through years of clinical trials, experiments, and tests, which yielded these results, and are outlined in detail in Dr. Campbell’s research. His findings show that when casein is consumed in large quantities, cancer cells increase in size, and when there is a cessation in consumption of casein, cancer tumor cells recede.[1] I later learned that elevated levels of protein can also cause kidney damage, liver problems, kidney stones, excess fat gain, contribute to the damaging of the lining of artery walls, lead to plaque build up in arteries, result in lethargy, diminish bone density, and cause a host of other health problems. If this is truly the case, as it has been revealed by Dr. Campbell and numerous other world renowned experts who came to the same conclusions through experimentation, observation, and scientific research, why are these products consumed at such high levels? With their direct correlations to increased risk of disease, why is casein, which has been linked to illnesses such as prostate cancer, more than any other protein, allowed to be sold in stores? Why are these products even produced? After all, who needs them, besides calves?

If we have special protein powders created from cow’s milk for human consumption, it would only make sense that it must be because our society sees a very high rate of protein deficiency. But, that isn’t the case at all. In fact, a protein deficiency is almost unheard of in America and only exists in someone who does not consume adequate calories. The reason this is so, is because of the macronutrient make-up of food. Food is only made up of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and water (and sometimes alcohol). Some level of protein is present in all foods, and in significant quantities in specific types of foods such as beans and other legumes, nuts, seeds, leafy green vegetables, other vegetables and grains. The amount of protein required by the human body (5-10% of total calories per day) is relatively low in comparison to the other macronutrients. It is therefore impossible to be protein deficient when sufficient calories are consumed. This is how nature works. In reality, most people in developed countries, including those following a plant-based diet, eat too much protein, not the other way around.[2] We clearly don’t have a health or nutritional need for whey or casein protein powders, so why are they here, why are they so popular, so common, and why is their use so infrequently questioned?

Part of the answer lies in the world of bodybuilding and the magazines, books, websites, athletes, and other individuals that feed the industry. The community that I have been part of for so long is a key factor in keeping these antiquated ideas about protein alive. It is therefore my (and others’) mission to effectively dispel these myths by showing a healthier way to support fitness goals without the use of any substances that came from a cow’s udder. As a semi-retired bodybuilder and current health and wellness advocate and multi-sport athlete, I endorse a whole-food, plant-based diet for optimal results, even when bodybuilding. I aim to put the desire for elevated levels of protein to rest by showing how a relatively low protein, whole-food, plant-based diet can support all athletic endeavors effectively and efficiently. I have achieved great results as a plant-based athlete for the past two decades, and have sought to lead by example.

VEGA SPORTS

Plant based-protein

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30g plant-based protein

From a complete multisource plant-based protein blend of pea, alfalfa, pumpkin seed and organic sunflower seed proteins.

6g BCAAs

Help support recovery with 30 grams of protein, that includes 6 grams of Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAAs)—isoleucine, leucine and valine.

1 billion CFUs probiotics (bacillus coagulans)

Shelf-stable, these probiotics can survive and thrive—no fridge required.

No sugar added

What IS clean, plant-based nutrition?

No matter what better means to you, Vega products are made with these principles in mind:

  • Plant-based
    At Vega, we make plant-based foods for every body. We believe you should grab real plant-based foods first. When you don’t have time, space, or napkins to eat the foods you love and normally choose, reach for Vega products, made with real plant-based food ingredients you can feel good about.As a term, “plant-based diet” is often used interchangeably with “vegan” (a diet and lifestyle that avoids all animal products in food, cosmetics, and apparel). While those who identify as vegan eat an exclusively plant-based diet by definition, eating a plant-based diet can fall along a spectrum with as many variations as there are people to make choices about food.  We’re not fans of narrow definitions and welcome everyone—no matter where you fall on the spectrum of a plant-based diet. Whether you’re adding one new plant-based food or 20, there are benefits to be found from making plant-based foods a bigger part of your life.

 

  • Nutrient DenseThe most nutrient dense foods are found in the plant kingdom. Minimally processed, whole plant-based foods give you more nutrition per bite (calories) than any other foods

 

  • Clean
    Clean can mean many things depending on your point of view. We start with real, whole foods and keep them as minimally processed as possible. Additionally, Vega products are:
    1. Certified vegan
    2. Gluten-free
    3. Non-GMO
    4. Made without dairy or soy ingredients, artificial flavors, colors or sweeteners

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